$136,000 Kroger grant will help Forgotten Harvest provide food for hungry in Southeast Michigan

$136,000 Kroger grant will help Forgotten Harvest provide food for hungry in Southeast Michigan
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Forgotten Harvest has received a $139,000 grant from The Kroger Co. Foundation to help end hunger in Southeast Michigan.

Rachel Hurst, corporate affairs manager for Michigan Kroger, presents the $139,000 check to Kirk Mayes, CEO of Forgotten Harvest.

The grant is part of Zero Hunger | Zero Waste, Kroger’s plan to end hunger in local communities and eliminate waste across the company by 2025.

“Forgotten Harvest stands proudly with corporate partners like The Kroger Co. of Michigan and its visionary Zero Hunger | Zero Waste initiative to end hunger and food insecurity while delivering healthy, nutritious food,” says Kirk Mayes, CEO of Forgotten Harvest. “Forgotten Harvest would not be able to help so many in need within our community without Kroger’s partnership and support.”

During 2017, Forgotten Harvest partnered with Michigan Kroger to collect more than 4.15 million pounds of donated surplus nutritious food.

During 2017, Forgotten Harvest partnered with Michigan Kroger to collect more than 4.15 million pounds of surplus nutritious food donated from 93 southeast Michigan Kroger stores and distribution facilities. According to USDA calculations, Kroger’s food donations gift will help provide enough food for 3.4 million meals to help those in need. Current U.S. Census data indicates that one in six people (589,000) and one in four children in metro Detroit face hunger and food insecurity.

The Kroger Co. of Michigan has partnered with Forgotten Harvest since 2004.

“The Kroger Co. of Michigan is pleased to endorse this generous grant to help end hunger and food waste in southeast Michigan,” says Rachel Hurst, corporate affairs manager for Michigan Kroger. “Everyone benefits from our ongoing ability to boost the nutrition level for hungry neighbors while diverting food from area landfills.”

Since 2010, Forgotten Harvest’s capacity has grown from rescuing 19.3 million pounds of food each year to 45.8 million pounds in 2017, a 135 percent increase.

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