Salon owner incorporates automotive model into Detroit hairstyling service

Salon owner incorporates automotive model into Detroit hairstyling service
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Hair, particularly among black women, has long been a cultural symbol of pride and beauty, but sometimes a source of consumer frustration.

Even in an era of products and services for virtually every style from natural to extravagant weave, many Detroiters struggle to find affordable shops that don’t consume massive amounts of their time and money.

While in New York Dana White learned about a styling process called the “Dominican blowout” that helped reduce time in the salon and improved her hair’s overall condition. The experience inspired her to open the first Paralee Boyd location in Southfield.

Inspired by Detroit’s traditional industry models, like car assembly and factory production, Paralee Boyd Salon has begun promoting “applied principles of lean manufacturing.” That process eliminates waste or any activity that doesn’t add value.

Having consulted auto engineers, owner Dana White adapted the process for styling and service, especially for women with thick and coarse hair. She recently launched her Detroit brand at 3939 Woodward Ave.

“In 2004 I moved to New York City and began a career in labor relations, all the while trying to answer a lifelong, unanswered question – ‘why can’t women with thick and curly hair find a quality, timely and service-based hair salon?’” White says.

While in New York she learned about a styling process called the “Dominican blowout” that helped reduce time in the salon and improved her hair’s overall condition. The experience inspired her to open the first Paralee Boyd location in Southfield after she returned to Michigan and encouraged her to provide her own solution for customers.

Designed to expand the company and improve on the Dominican model, White’s opening in Detroit offers walk-in service seven days a week. The goal, she says, was to challenge the idea that hair texture limits style options and dictates the length and cost of a visit.

“Paralee Boyd incorporates lean manufacturing to service guests under a certain time period and price point,” White says. “I adopted these processes into my brand by finding the most effective way to service our guests and solve long-standing problems of overbooking, extended appointments and over-pricing.”

Small shops are the mainstay of our neighborhoods. Open the door and look inside and you will discover dreamers and doers who embody the spirit and energy of Detroit’s entrepreneurial class. We invite you to meet them inside our Small Shops series, sponsored by Bank of America.

For more information about Paralee Boyd Salon visit the website paraleeboyd.com.

This Small Shops feature is supported by Bank of America. To learn more about Bank of America’s many programs and resources for small business owners visit: https://www.bankofamerica.com/smallbusiness/business-financing.go

 

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